UPDATED7/21/19 : 'spooky' effect of physics that Einstein couldn't believe has been photographed

Discussion in 'College Football Soundoff' started by P.G.S., Jul 13, 2019.

  1. P.G.S.

    P.G.S. Well-Known Member
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    https://amp.businessinsider.com/quantum-entanglement-einstein-first-picture-2019-7

    A 'spooky' effect of physics that Einstein couldn't believe has been photographed for the first time


    [​IMG]
    The first photos of quantum-entangled particles showing a Bell inequality.
    Paul-Antoine Moreau et al./Science Advances



    • Albert Einstein's work in part led to the prediction of quantumentanglement: the idea that two particles can remain connected across vast distances of space and time.
    • Einstein found the idea absurd and "spooky," but it has since been proven with countless quantum physics experiments.
    • No had ever photographed entangled photons (pieces of light), though, until one research team recently did so with a high-tech laser experiment.

    The black-and-white photo above isn't much to look at. However, the ghostly, eye-like shapes illustrate a strange phenomenon that rattled Albert Einstein so much that he died disbelieving it could exist.

    The picture represents the first-ever photograph of quantum entanglement, or the "spooky" pairing of particles.

    "The image we've managed to capture is an elegant demonstration of a fundamental property of nature, seen for the very first time in the form of an image," Paul-Antoine Moreau, a physicist at the University of Glasgow, said in a press release.

    Moreau led a team of researchers who managed to create the image, which the group published in a study on Friday in the journal Science Advances.


    Quantum entanglement 101
    Quantum entanglement is the now well documented idea that two tiny particles can be paired and separated, yet remain intimately and instantly connected across vast distances.

    By the laws of physics, two particles can get entangled with a binary, yes-or-no-like property or state, such as spin or phase polarization. But that state remains fuzzy - or in "superposition" - until one particle is measured. Then at the exact moment of observation, even if the particles are separated by light-years of space, the other particle takes on the opposite state of its twin.

    To understand this concept, imagine each entangled particle were a box containing a cat. The cat inside would be both alive and dead at the same time - that is, until someone opened one of the boxes. If the cat seen in one box was alive, then the cat in the other box would have to be dead (or vice versa).

    Einstein thought this teleportation-like effect was so absurd that he described it as "spooky action at a distance."

    "Einstein couldn't accept this," J.C. Séamus Davis, a physicist at Cornell University who studies quantum mechanics, previously told Business Insider. "He essentially went to his grave not accepting this as fact, but it's now been shown millions of times to work."

    One of the latest studies to prove it, published in February 2017, used 600-year-old starlight to show that two particles couldn't "cheat" at the moment of entanglement and share a state before being measured.

    How and why small particles can get entangled makes no sense in the context of our everyday lives. At tiny scales, the universe appears to play by different rules, many of which are paradoxical and defy reason. In some quantum-mechanical scenarios, for instance, an effect doesn't always follow a cause; the effect can, in fact, happen before its cause occurs.

    No one should be blamed for being confused by quantum mechanics, Davis said, since "we didn't evolve to understand" the theory and its counterintuitive ramifications.

    "But the math, the predictions starting in the 1920s, have all turned out to be correct," he said. "It's the most successful scientific theory in the human race."

    In all those decades, however, no one has ever captured an image of entangled particles. So that is what Moreau and his colleagues set out to do.

    How entanglement was photographed for the first time


    [​IMG]
    Researchers used ultraviolet lasers, polarizing filters, sensors, and other equipment to photograph quantum entanglement for the first time.
    Paul-Antoine Moreau et al./Science Advances


    Particles of light called photons can be entangled by a number of quantum properties. With their experiment, though, the researchers chose a property called phase. The photons came out of an ultraviolet laser beam, then passed through a special crystal known to entangle the phase of some photons.

    Next, their experiment split the beam into two equal "arms" with a beam splitter, or half-mirrored glass. At this point, some of the photons that the crystal had entangled parted ways.

    One arm of photons passed through a filter to limit the particles to one of four phases (a phase filter effectively "measures" that property of a photon, so it'd instantly cause its partner to flip). Then the photons went into a very sensitive camera that's able to detect individual photons. The other arm led to a high-speed trigger device for the camera.

    The camera sensor recorded information only when two entangled photons - each from a separate arm - arrived at their respective detectors at same time and with opposite phases. Over time, the researchers built up a patterned image of the entangled photons striking the camera.

    Entangled photons that passed through the phase filter were expected to form four eye-like patterns, and that's exactly what the image showed.

    The experiment piles on more proof that what spooked Einstein is real, but also that entangled particles might be used in future imaging applications in science, Moreau said.

    UPDATE

    https://amp.tweaktown.com/?url=http...glement-teleports-object-300-miles/index.html


    7/21/19 UPDATE

    https://www.sciencealert.com/physic...he-smallest-scale-by-using-a-quantum-computer
     
    1 P.G.S., Jul 13, 2019
    Last edited: Jul 21, 2019 at 2:50 PM
  2. RTider77

    RTider77 Well-Known Member
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    Awesome stuff sir! Spooky too!
     
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  3. trademarcs

    trademarcs Well-Known Member
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    TLDR
     
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  4. CardX

    CardX Well-Known Member
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  5. P.G.S.

    P.G.S. Well-Known Member
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    Whale dair R pikchairs 4 U 2 luk at.
     
  6. P.G.S.

    P.G.S. Well-Known Member
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    [​IMG]
     
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  7. GatorTheo

    GatorTheo Well-Known Member
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  8. RTider77

    RTider77 Well-Known Member
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    Laughing
     
  9. Arrogant_Bastard

    Arrogant_Bastard Well-Known Member
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    Wonder if this will be a good defense in court. "I didn't willingly do this; It was that asshole 10 light-years away that made me do it."
     
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  10. EvilMonkeyInTheCloset

    EvilMonkeyInTheCloset Well-Known Member
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  11. P.G.S.

    P.G.S. Well-Known Member
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    Well this for 1.

    https://m.phys.org/news/2016-09-quantum-advances-entanglement.html

    Quantum computers are considered a next generation of computing after the integrated circuit, silicon-chip based computers that now dominate information processing technology. Current computers use long strings of zeros and ones—called bits—to process information. By contrast, quantum computers process information by harnessing the remarkable power of quantum mechanics that encodes 0s and 1s in quantum states called qubits. Qubits configure in two unusual ways: "superposition" and "entanglement."

    For the next steps on this promising path toward making quantum computing practical, Furusawa envisions creating 2-D and 3-D lattices of the entangled state. "This will enable us to make topological quantum computing, which is very robust quantum computing," he said.
     
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  12. NoleThruAndThru

    NoleThruAndThru Well-Known Member
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    So..... somewhere there’s an Auburn that doesn’t cheat?

    Unpossible.
     
  13. P.G.S.

    P.G.S. Well-Known Member
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    Teetotally unimpossiblyful.
     
  14. sdave

    sdave Well-Known Member
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    My head hurts
     
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  15. TeganInBama

    TeganInBama Well-Known Member
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    Time travel
     
  16. pooods

    pooods Well-Known Member
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  17. Zgeo

    Zgeo Well-Known Member
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    This explains why Georgia thinks it is good, they were observed to be bad, hence the the partner Georgia team must be good.....
     
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  18. YellowlabOSU

    YellowlabOSU Well-Known Member
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    I have been saying this for years, I just haven't been able to articulate it.
     
    18 YellowlabOSU, Jul 13, 2019
    Last edited: Jul 14, 2019
  19. Zgeo

    Zgeo Well-Known Member
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    I am more interested in wether man enters into an Interdimensional state at death.....
     
  20. EvilMonkeyInTheCloset

    EvilMonkeyInTheCloset Well-Known Member
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    [​IMG]
     
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  21. EvilMonkeyInTheCloset

    EvilMonkeyInTheCloset Well-Known Member
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    Georgia could use this to time travel back 2 years and change the outcome of the NCG so that Bama wouldn't have won the title.
     
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  22. DeputyDodge

    DeputyDodge Well-Known Member
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    I’m not even sad that I don’t understand this
     
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  23. KnightNasty

    KnightNasty Well-Known Member
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    This makes perfect sense and explains everything...

    In 2015 UCF didn’t win a game, while in 2017 we didn’t lose a game and won a national Championship.

    So that means our quantum cosmic twin went undefeated and won a national Championship in 2015.

    Only makes that the reason we didn’t win a game in 2015 is b/c both sides of UCF’s quantum pairing needs to champ... SmokinSmile
     
    23 KnightNasty, Jul 14, 2019
    Last edited: Jul 14, 2019
    UCFhonors, P.G.S., Zgeo and 1 other person like this.
  24. Zgeo

    Zgeo Well-Known Member
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    Superman comic books were all over this years ago......Bizzarro world were everything was the opposite of Earth including the name.....

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bizarro_World
     
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  25. sheluvsbama

    sheluvsbama Well-Known Member
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    Quantum entanglement…. a reality of the world. I like it.
     
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  26. Wareo

    Wareo Well-Known Member
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    Yea this theory has been around for a while, and proven over and over mathematically. The fact they got a picture is really cool. This is how they were able to "teleport" a photon before. Will never work with large objects as you would need to know what every little proton/neutron/electron in the object is doing at the same time and instantly. Still really cool.

    Also shows how stupidly brilliant Einstein really was..
     
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  27. P.G.S.

    P.G.S. Well-Known Member
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    https://amp.tweaktown.com/?url=http...glement-teleports-object-300-miles/index.html

    China #1 in quantum entanglement, teleports object 300 miles
    Jak Connor, TweakTown
    July 15, 2019

    The human race has made another milestone in the quantum entanglement field where they have managed to teleport an electron to a low-orbiting satellite 300 miles away.

    [​IMG]
    According to a team of researchers in China, scientists have managed to use quantum entanglement to teleport an electron that is 300 miles away. An MIT Technology Review said that this is the furthest the technology has managed to teleport an object, the scientists findings have been published in a paper online at arXiv.

    This isn't the first test of its kind, for about a month these scientists have conducted many tests and have beamed up millions of photons from their ground site located in Tibet. The team said that "This work establishes the first ground-to-satellite up-link for faithful and ultra-long-distance quantum teleportation, an essential step toward global-scale quantum Internet."

    For those that don't know, quantum entanglement is a "strange phenomenon" that happens "when two quantum objects, such as photons, form at the same instant and point in space and so share the same existence. In technical terms, they are described by the same wave function."
     
  28. CB3UK

    CB3UK Well-Known Member
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    OK....so teleportation is the practical application of this. I couldnt quit figure it out from the article. It seemed like maybe hologram projection or something could come from it? But if its stating that the other protons are in an opposite state ie Schrodinger's cat.....well....we're gonna need a lot of test runs on that teleporter Scotty.
     
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  29. KnightNasty

    KnightNasty Well-Known Member
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    So, I totally knew what Schrodinger’s cat was and knew exactly what they were talking about when they were referencing it in the article even though they made no reference to Schrodinger. I read that and was thinking, “oh ok, Schrodinger’s cat. Cool.”

    ...and I knew that from watching the Big Bang Theory tv show lol.
     
  30. P.G.S.

    P.G.S. Well-Known Member
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    https://www.sciencealert.com/physic...he-smallest-scale-by-using-a-quantum-computer

    Physicists Have Reversed Time on The Smallest Scale by Using a Quantum Computer

    BY MIKE MCRAE

    JULY 20, 2019

    It's easy to take time's arrow for granted - but the gears of physics actually work just as smoothly in reverse. Maybe that time machine is possible after all?


    An experiment earlier this year shows just how much wiggle room we can expect when it comes to distinguishing the past from the future, at least on a quantum scale. It might not allow us to relive the 1960s, but it could help us better understand why not.

    Researchers from Russia and the US teamed up to find a way to break, or at least bend, one of physics' most fundamental laws on energy.


    The second law of thermodynamics is less a hard rule and more of a guiding principle for the Universe. It says hot things get colder over time as energy transforms and spreads out from areas where it's most intense.


    It's a principle that explains why your coffee won't stay hot in a cold room, why it's easier to scramble an egg than unscramble it, and why nobody will ever let you patent a perpetual motion machine.


    It's also the closest we can get to a rule that tells us why we can remember what we had for dinner last night, but have no memory of next Christmas.


    "That law is closely related to the notion of the arrow of time that posits the one-way direction of time from the past to the future," says quantum physicist Gordey Lesovik from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology.


    Virtually every other rule in physics can be flipped and still make sense. For example, you could zoom in on a game of pool, and a single collision between any two balls won't look weird if you happened to see it in reverse.

    On the other hand, if you watched balls roll out of pockets and reform the starting pyramid, it would be a sobering experience. That's the second law at work for you.


    On the macro scale of omelettes and games of pool, we shouldn't expect a lot of give in the laws of thermodynamics. But as we focus in on the tiny gears of reality - in this case, solitary electrons - loopholes appear.


    Electrons aren't like tiny billiard balls, they're more akin to information that occupies a space. Their details are defined by something called the Schrödinger equation, which represents the possibilities of an electron's characteristics as a wave of chance.


    If this is a bit confusing, let's go back to imagining a game of pool, but this time the lights are off. You start with the information – a cue ball – in your hand, and then send it rolling across the table.


    The Schrödinger equation tells you that ball is somewhere on the pool table moving around at a certain speed. In quantum terms, the ball is everywhere at a bunch of speeds … some just more likely than others.

    You can stick your hand out and grab it to pinpoint its location, but now you're not sure of how fast it was going. You could also gently brush your finger against it and confidently know its velocity, but where it went... who knows?


    There's one other trick you could use, though. A split second after you send that ball rolling, you can be fairly sure it's still near your hand moving at a high rate.


    In one sense, the Schrödinger equation predicts the same thing for quantum particles. Over time, the possibilities of a particle's positions and velocities expands.


    "However, Schrödinger's equation is reversible," says materials scientist Valerii Vinokur from the Argonne National Laboratory in the US.


    "Mathematically, it means that under a certain transformation called complex conjugation, the equation will describe a 'smeared' electron localising back into a small region of space over the same time period."


    It's as if your cue ball was no longer spreading out in a wave of infinite possible positions across the dark table, but rewinding back into your hand.

    In theory, there's nothing stopping it from occurring spontaneously. You'd need to stare at 10 billion electron-sized pool tables every second and the lifetime of our Universe to see it happen once, though.


    Rather than patiently wait around and watch funding trickle away, the team used the undetermined states of particles in a quantum computer as their pool ball, and some clever manipulation of the computer as their 'time machine'.


    Each of these states, or qubits, was arranged into a simple state which corresponded to a hand holding the ball. Once the quantum computer was set into action, these states rolled out into a range of possibilities.


    By tweaking certain conditions in the computer's setup, those possibilities were confined in a way that effectively rewound the Schrödinger equation deliberately.


    To test this, the team launched the set-up again, as if kicking a pool table and watching the scattered balls rearrange into the initial pyramid shape. In about 85 percent of trials based on just two qubits, this is exactly what happened.


    On a practical level, the algorithms they used to manipulate the Schrödinger equation into rewinding in this way could help improve the accuracy of quantum computers.


    It's not the first time this team has given the second law of thermodynamics a good shake. A couple of years ago they entangled some particles and managed to heat and cool them in such a way they effectively behaved like a perpetual motion machine.


    Finding ways to push the limits of such physical laws on the quantum scale just might help us better understand why the Universe 'flows' like it does.


    This research was published in Scientific Reports.


    A version of this article was first published in March 2019.
     

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