POLL: Most Important Historical Event(s)

Discussion in 'College Football Soundoff' started by sgacock, May 20, 2019.

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Poll: What are the THREE most importsnt historical events

  1. Invention of An Alphabet

    25 vote(s)
    32.1%
  2. Birth and Teachings of Christ

    37 vote(s)
    47.4%
  3. Fall of Rome

    1 vote(s)
    1.3%
  4. Birth and Teachings of Muhammed

    3 vote(s)
    3.8%
  5. Mongol Conquest

    1 vote(s)
    1.3%
  6. Printing Press, Reformation & Renaissance

    29 vote(s)
    37.2%
  7. European Expansion to the World

    11 vote(s)
    14.1%
  8. Industrial Revolution & Computer Revolution

    35 vote(s)
    44.9%
  9. The Rise of Republics (American French & Progeny)

    7 vote(s)
    9.0%
  10. Other

    9 vote(s)
    11.5%
Multiple votes are allowed.
  1. DuckWeber

    DuckWeber Well-Known Member
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    The invention of architecture created civilization (literally, the creation of cities).. Without that, we never leave the stone age.
     
  2. USMC Cat

    USMC Cat Well-Known Member
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    Sure we do. Nomadic groups traded with each other all the time. They conducted business, they disputed territory, they imposed laws, they waged wars.

    You dont have to live in any one place to discover things.
     
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  3. ImmaTiger

    ImmaTiger Well-Known Member
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    An alphabet and numbering system.

    They combine to form the basis for complex thought, and accurately relaying those thoughts to others - the sharing of knowledge & learning.

    Nothing else on that list transpires (or happens as accurately) without them.
     
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  4. UCFhonors

    UCFhonors Well-Known Member
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    Let me guess, you're an architect....

    Never leave the stone age.... you couldn't be more wrong. Architecture is a reflection of civilization, not a creator of it. FWIW, the first stone structures looked the same as their wood and mud predecessors.

    Banking is the current modern profession who has had the greatest impact on the world. And it's not even close. The loan had created more economic progress in the last 150 years than from the invention of the wheel until that time.

    #UCFacts

    SmokinSmile
     
  5. UCFhonors

    UCFhonors Well-Known Member
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    I didn't realize this until I saw the Magna Carta in the British Library that is only lasted 13 days until the Pope annulled it.

    The US Constitution lasted a little longer...

    #UCFacts

    SmokinSmile
     
    85 UCFhonors, May 21, 2019
    Last edited: May 21, 2019
  6. autzen_rocks

    autzen_rocks Poster
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    It’s not that it lasted for a short time. It’s what is in the words that matters.
     
  7. sgacock

    sgacock Well-Known Member
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    Good choice! Pasteur's contributions were monumental to medicine and an understanding of germs. He deserves his fame! However, his was not so much discovery of germs (as so many assert) but proof of germ then-theory that had been fighting an uphill battle for several centuries against the prevalent miasma theory handed down through the dark ages from the Greeks.

    I consider his contemporary Robert Koch to be just as important because of his four postulates that were so important to development of "the scientific method.

    Another important contemporary whose germ studies slightly pre-dated Pasteur was Jon Snow. Oops. JoHn Snow. I'll cut and paste wiki article (knowing that wiki always has some inaccuracies, but this one seems to match my prior readings)

    John Snow
    Main article: 1854 Broad Street cholera outbreak
    [​IMG]
    Original map by John Snow showing the clusters of cholera cases in the London epidemic of 1854
    John Snow was a skeptic of the then-dominant miasma theory. Even though the germ theory of disease pioneered by Girolamo Fracastoro (1546) had not yet achieved full development or widespread currency, Snow demonstrated a clear understanding of germ theory in his writings. He first published his theory in an 1849 essay On the Mode of Communication of Cholera, in which he correctly suggested that the fecal-oral route was the mode of communication, and that the disease replicated itself in the lower intestines. He even proposed in his 1855 edition of the work, that the structure of cholera was that of a cell.

    Having rejected effluvia and the poisoning of the blood in the first instance, and being led to the conclusion that the disease is something that acts directly on the alimentary canal, the excretions of the sick at once suggest themselves as containing some material which being accidentally swallowed might attach itself to the mucous membrane of the small intestines, and there multiply itself by appropriation of surrounding matter, in virtue of molecular changes going on within it, or capable of going on, as soon as it is placed in congenial circumstances.


    For the morbid matter of cholera having the property of reproducing its own kind, must necessarily have some sort of structure, most likely that of a cell. It is no objection to this view that the structure of the cholera poison cannot be recognized by the microscope, for the matter of smallpox and of chancre can only be recognized by their effects, and not by their physical properties.


    Snow's 1849 recommendation that water be "filtered and boiled before it is used" is one of the first practical applications of germ theory in the area of public health and is the antecedent to the modern boil-water advisory.

    In 1855 he published a second edition of his article, documenting his more elaborate investigation of the effect of the water supply in the Soho, London epidemic of 1854.

    By talking to local residents, he identified the source of the outbreak as the public water pump on Broad Street (now Broadwick Street). Although Snow's chemical and microscope examination of a water sample from the Broad Street pump did not conclusively prove its danger, his studies of the pattern of the disease were convincing enough to persuade the local council to disable the well pump by removing its handle. This action has been commonly credited as ending the outbreak, but Snow observed that the epidemic may have already been in rapid decline.[24]

    Snow later used a dot map to illustrate the cluster of cholera cases around the pump. He also used statistics to illustrate the connection between the quality of the water source and cholera cases. He showed that the Southwark and Vauxhall Waterworks Company was taking water from sewage-polluted sections of the Thames and delivering the water to homes, leading to an increased incidence of cholera. Snow's study was a major event in the history of public health and geography. It is regarded as one of the founding events of the science of epidemiology.

    Later, researchers discovered that this public well had been dug only three feet from an old cesspit, which had begun to leak fecal bacteria.[citation needed] The diapers of a baby, who had contracted cholera from another source, had been washed into this cesspit. Its opening was originally under a nearby house, which had been rebuilt farther away after a fire. The city had widened the street and the cesspit was lost. It was common at the time to have a cesspit under most homes. Most families tried to have their raw sewage collected and dumped in the Thames to prevent their cesspit from filling faster than the sewage could decompose into the soil.

    After the cholera epidemic had subsided, government officials replaced the handle on the Broad Street pump. They had responded only to the urgent threat posed to the population, and afterward they rejected Snow's theory. To accept his proposal would have meant accepting the fecal-oral method transmission of disease, which they dismissed.[25]
     
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  8. Tidaltown

    Tidaltown Well-Known Member
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    I'd have to leave out the Mongols. The primary technology they spread was warfare technology, and even then most nations did not adopt their tactics, and few studied them until many centuries later. Though Mongol kingdoms, with the exception of some intolerant Muslim Mongol rulers, were generally tolerant of all monotheistic religions, that commendable quality did not influence their subjects who remained intolerant of other faiths once they were freed from Mongol oppression.

    You rightly noted the Mongols utterly destroyed libraries, but it was Baghdad's famous library that was destroyed by Mongols, not Alexandria's. Muslims get the credit for destroying Alexandria's. Though regretful, this does not qualify as a top 5 historical event.

    Finally, because Mongols were so prolifically cruel and murderous, several civilizations never recovered from their destruction (see Khwarazmia), and Russia was reduced to a feudal backwater after 200 years of what Marx termed "the bloody swamp of the Mongol yoke." The Mongols retarded Russia's development and isolated it from Europe. Moreover, you'd be hard pressed to list any meaningful positive contributions the Mongols made to China other than increasing trade, unless you believe statues and paintings of horses--their artistic obsession--was the greatest form of art.

    If you wish for a Mongol top 10 achievement, it was managing to see that, perhaps through palace intrigue, aristocratic Mongol kinsmen likely killed Ogedai Khan and thus ended Subedei's planned conquest of Europe. Subedei's plan was one of 20 years duration, and he'd proven himself one of history's greatest military commanders, but his campaign was only in its initial stage. His army was about 200,000 by some accounts (most state 80,000 to 100,000) and it was easily the world's greatest. They had already completely destroyed Hungary's army at Mohi in 1241--the largest in Europe--and had rampaged through southern Poland and what today are Bulgaria and Romania. That followed their conquest of all land to the east, most notably Ukraine, Georgia, Azerbaijan, and the lands of central asia. They would soon conquer Persia, Syria, and what today is Iraq. No European army could have stopped them from reaching the Atlantic, and the Byzantines would have easily been annihilated. Only the death of the khan saved Europe from seeing the Dark Ages extended far past the 15th Century as they'd have ruled Europe as cruelly as they did Russia.

    Ogedai's death a top 10 historical event? Maybe, but that's it with the Mongols.
     
    88 Tidaltown, May 21, 2019
    Last edited: May 21, 2019
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  9. GoldenAlley

    GoldenAlley Well-Known Member
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    Per the request of King John when he became frustrated he had to enforce it.

    A second version would be issued by Henry III in 1225. A copy of it is displayed in our National Archives in DC.
     
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  10. sgacock

    sgacock Well-Known Member
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    The Pope might have annulled the Magna Carta but the English Lords and their Swords did not. In 200 years, Rome would cease to have any power in England.

    It led to the development of the Courts of Equity and to the power of the House of Lords and eventually to the House of Commons. By the time of the American and French Revolutions, the King was only slightly more than a puppet. Parliament ran things. Without the Magna Carta and the political theories and freedoms it spawned, England would not have become the world's only true Constitutional Monarchy and her former colonies would not have become the world's first Republic.

    Our Constitution codified English political theory arising out of the Magna Carta.
     
    90 sgacock, May 21, 2019
    Last edited: May 21, 2019
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  11. jeans15

    jeans15 Well-Known Member
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    ET coming to earth confirming the Galactic Empire once existed.
     
  12. Fear-the-Spear

    Fear-the-Spear Well-Known Member
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    Domesticating the horse. Without that all but the language and religious events would have been stalled or eliminated
     
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  13. texaggie95

    texaggie95 Well-Known Member
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    I reviewed the video. I'm not sure what part you think I'm missing or misinformed about. He basically told me what I already knew.

    Can you clarify your concerns on my misconceptions?
     
  14. leatherhemet

    leatherhemet Well-Known Member
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    If you already knew about the nuances the speaker lays out, then fine. I just wanted to point out the details that people often times miss or gloss over. It wasn't as black and white as the "Galileo " camp vs. "the church" just to point out one example.
     
  15. texaggie95

    texaggie95 Well-Known Member
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    Np. Politics is politics no matter what year you are from and the church was essentially a government with the same issues we face today. :)

    I'm an avid history buff. Still doesn't change my opinion on that the church was a hindrance rather than a catalyst though.
     
  16. leatherhemet

    leatherhemet Well-Known Member
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    Maybe a speed bump in the big picture, is how I'd describe it.
     
  17. AlaCrimsonTide06

    AlaCrimsonTide06 Well-Known Member
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    That's truly sad. A large portion of the fault can be laid on the so called "Muslim" countries and many of the present day followers..etc.

    Instead of being angry & doing things that are against the teachings of Islam, Muslims should be education others, doing good service to others...etc. Culture mixed in with religion can always cause things to stray away from what the religion actually teaches.

    The three choices I chose are

    Alphabet
    Jesus
    Muhammad (peace be upon both him and Jesus)
     
  18. texaggie95

    texaggie95 Well-Known Member
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    Fair, but it was the era they were effectively in power. Prior to that they were influential, after that era their power waned. It's also why effectively the Islamic empires have not progressed. Religion has trumped science as a form of education.
     
  19. DuckWeber

    DuckWeber Well-Known Member
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    The "wood and mud predecessors" were more primitive architecture, but architecture, nonetheless. The allowed people to settle down and develop agriculture, metallurgy and civilization (literally, the building of "civitae," cities), which was not possible, for nomads.
     
  20. DuckWeber

    DuckWeber Well-Known Member
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    Here's where I disagree: The horse was extinct in the Americas (factoid: Horses originated here, and migrated to Asia, then went extinct here.), yet great civilizations were built here (Olmec, Maya, Inca, Aztec). They may have been behind the Europeans technologically, but that was more an accident of isolation, than a failing on their part.
     
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  21. DuckWeber

    DuckWeber Well-Known Member
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    Both agriculture and metallurgy depend on long-term settlement in a given location. Settlement demands structure and structures. Nomads are much too fluid, to independently accomplish either of these; they need someone who has settled, to show them how it is done; then they can innovate.
     
  22. Fear-the-Spear

    Fear-the-Spear Well-Known Member
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    North American horses did not migrate to Asia. They had/have their own specie, Przewalski's horse, descended from the Botai. They were the first to domesticate the horse while the North American horse was extinct.
    Horses were the first means of transportation (3500-4000 yrs ago) and without that commerce wouldn't exist. Llamas and Alpaca and Camels about 3000 yrs ago
     
  23. DuckWeber

    DuckWeber Well-Known Member
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    I stand corrected, re.: the migration of the horse, however, commerce existed many thousands of years before the domestication of the horse, and in North America (north of Mexico), existed without any work animals larger than dogs, until the conquistadores re-introduced horses into their new possessions.
     
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  24. fleckabelly

    fleckabelly Well-Known Member
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    The creation of words. The only reason why humans became the dominant species on this planet.
     
  25. sgacock

    sgacock Well-Known Member
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    Opposable thumbs - tool use and tool making.

    [​IMG]
     
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  26. fleckabelly

    fleckabelly Well-Known Member
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    Obviously gave us and other great apes a huge advantage, but communication is how we took over the world.
     
  27. sgacock

    sgacock Well-Known Member
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    But we started communication with sign language using our opposable thumb. :D. Kidding, of course.

    Neither tool use/development nor communication was probably an "event." Instead, both were evolutionary and learning developments that took place over thousands of years. (Yes, I assert that Evolution is merely a tool of God - who provides certain "sparks" along the way.)
     

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