Place to put my Nonsense Thread.

brooky03

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If I didn't have a job I would totally be a night owl. Going to bed at 3 and waking up at 6:30 sounds unhealthy, though.

I go in at 8:30 and work from home a decent amount. I’ve gotten by on little sleep since I was a teenager. It’ll catch up to me eventually I’m sure.
 
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Villian07

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All Lives Matter isn’t a statement of equality, though. If it existed in a vacuum, sure, it would be fine. But it was a counter-point to BLM, which wasn’t saying all lives didn’t matter, in the first place.

If a kid wants to wear an All Lives Matter t-shirt like a dickhead, then he’s entitled to. But kids aren’t entitled to decide what a school does or doesn’t hang from the walls, or what does or doesn’t get erased from the chalkboard.

I’m not going to pretend that a teacher erasing “All Lives Matter” (which was written with the intent to ruffle feathers anyway) is a big deal or some smoking gun for a supposed Liberal agenda. That’s unreasonable.
Saying all lives matter is racist too???

how exactly do you know the intent on what all lives matters means when whoever first coined it?

To me it was more yea, black lives matter, but not just black lives, all lives. White people get murdered by police too, theres just not a riot everytime it happens.

Hell I know a man in my podunk town that was murdered by the police for banging the sheriffs wife. Sheriff ran him over in his police car when dude was standing in his own yard bc he was “brandishing a kitchen knife” lmao.
 

brooky03

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But the part u covieniently left out is now every corporation that rely on gas for distribution now has a new 3% expense which they will compensate for by raising the prices of whatever they produce/sell.

Raising the price of gas will raise the price of pretty much everything sans maybe ur local farmers market.

I didn’t leave that out. That’s the first part I mentioned when I said to assume everything we consume is 20% price reliant on oil and showed the 20% x 10% calculation. I was being generous to your point in the calculations.

The gist of it is that a 10% increase to the expenses of oil companies results in a small fraction of an increase in what we pay for products. They don’t pay 10% more and then we pay 10% more as a result.
 

Villian07

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Back to the kid, how do you think he would have been received if he wanted to hang a white lives matter sign????
 

Villian07

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I didn’t leave that out. That’s the first part I mentioned when I said to assume everything we consume is 20% price reliant on oil and showed the 20% x 10% calculation. I was being generous to your point in the calculations.

The gist of it is that a 10% increase to the expenses of oil companies results in a small fraction of an increase in what we pay for products. They don’t pay 10% more and then we pay 10% more as a result.
My bad when you said we i thought u meant consumers not companies.

nvm i misread like a dolt. My bad
 

brooky03

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Saying all lives matter is racist too???

how exactly do you know the intent on what all lives matters means when whoever first coined it?

To me it was more yea, black lives matter, but not just black lives, all lives. White people get murdered by police too, theres just not a riot everytime it happens.

Hell I know a man in my podunk town that was murdered by the police for banging the sheriffs wife. Sheriff ran him over in his police car when dude was standing in his own yard bc he was “brandishing a kitchen knife” lmao.

All Lives Matter isn’t racist. It’s dumb. BLM means that all lives matter, including Black lives, because the problem was that Black people were being treated like their lives matter less.

Since it’s redundant to say all lives matter, because nobody was saying they don’t and nobody was saying Black Lives Matter more, All Lives Matter is a waste of a statement. At the height of this, it was an intentionally provocative statement with no purpose behind it other than to conflict with BLM.
 

toonces11

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So they raise prices a little bit. You care that much about an extra dime per gallon? $2 more per fill-up is breaking the bank?
I would be for it if they cap the profit margin gas companies are allowed to make.
 

toonces11

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All Lives Matter isn’t a statement of equality, though. If it existed in a vacuum, sure, it would be fine. But it was a counter-point to BLM, which wasn’t saying all lives didn’t matter, in the first place.

If a kid wants to wear an All Lives Matter t-shirt like a dickhead, then he’s entitled to. But kids aren’t entitled to decide what a school does or doesn’t hang from the walls, or what does or doesn’t get erased from the chalkboard.

I’m not going to pretend that a teacher erasing “All Lives Matter” (which was written with the intent to ruffle feathers anyway) is a big deal or some smoking gun for a supposed Liberal agenda. That’s unreasonable.
Would you feel the same way if someone erased BLM off a chalkboard? The entire BLM "movement" was flawed to start, worsened by terrible leadership, rooted in one of the worst mission statements on their official website--which I believe has slowly and progressively been amended to not sound dumber than sh*t. And now its become a way for people of color to openly and exclusively support events and people based completely on skin color.
 

JimboBBN

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Exactly so white kids just dont get a sign, done deal. Regardless if it makes them feel alienated or unincluded or that their life doesnt matter?
The thing is, no one thinks that black lives are any less important than any other race. Its just another ploy to be a victim by the same people who can't take any responsibility for their actions or situations. Like most other things in this country, its completely cool to say black lives matter, well, because they're black.
 

brooky03

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Exactly so white kids just dont get a sign, done deal. Regardless if it makes them feel alienated or unincluded or that their life doesnt matter?

Why would it make them feel like their life doesn’t matter?
 

brooky03

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Would you feel the same way if someone erased BLM off a chalkboard? The entire BLM "movement" was flawed to start, worsened by terrible leadership, rooted in one of the worst mission statements on their official website--which I believe has slowly and progressively been amended to not sound dumber than sh*t. And now its become a way for people of color to openly and exclusively support events and people based completely on skin color.

I would not have a problem with a teacher erasing BLM from a chalkboard.

I don’t have a problem with people trying to disproportionately support Black owned businesses, BLM events, or people who support BLM. I personally don’t care who owns whatever business I go to. I’m not heading off to the local BLM parade. But if somebody wants to go exclusively to Black owned businesses flying BLM banners or BLM fundraisers or listen to BLM speakers, to help a marginalized race achieve higher socio-economic standing, good.
 

lurkeraspect84

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I used to get up at 4. Be at the jail by 5. Now I get to sleep all the way to 5.
^This is my wife. Except she gets up @2am.I sleep in til 6 on my days off but i'm usually up when I get this message from her.

Untitled.png
 

dukedevilz

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Single parent homes are a symptom more so than a cause. I know this is a big talking point for you. You think that the plight of Black people is largely, maybe mostly, influenced by Black fathers impregnating women and bouncing. I don’t think that’s a reasonable conclusion (edit: I don’t think that’s the MOST reasonable conclusion).

Rubbish. There were more intact black families pre-1960. Only since LBJ's welfare initiative did the tide turn. The government paid unmarried women more if they didn't have a man in the house. Essentially they were married to the sate. The net loss has been catastrophic for the black community. Children need two actively involved parents. The stats on single-parent homes are jaw-dropping; the discrepancies that you see between single parent and two-parent homes is much wider than anything you'll see with race or gender. Of course not all women seek that, but offering more money, on the conditions of not having a man in the home, should have never been on the table in the first place.

marriage-over-time-race.png


These numbers indicate that close to 70% of black couples have babies out of wedlock. And the odds of a couple sticking together, if they're not already married, is slim. Black children are at a HUGE disadvantage if there's only one actively involved parent. I believe in the value of mentorships. There are people that can offset the void of a parent, such as a stepfather, uncle, older brother, coach, or neighbor. If they're not being raised by their parents, by default they'll be raised/mentored by their peers, which is usually not a good ideal.

The Brookings Institute conducted a study where they gathered that only 2% of people find themselves in poverty that graduate high school, get a full-time job, and wait until they're 21 to get married and have children. Pretty basic strategy, which if followed, would minimize a lot of the grief.

figure7-1-w640.png

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GhostOf301

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Rubbish. There were more intact black families pre-1960. Only since LBJ's welfare initiative did the tide turn. The government paid unmarried women more if they didn't have a man in the house. Essentially they were married to the sate. The net loss has been catastrophic for the black community. Children need two actively involved parents. The stats on single-parent homes are jaw-dropping; the discrepancies that you see between single parent and two-parent homes is much wider than anything you'll see with race or gender. Of course not all women seek that, but offering more money, on the conditions of not having a man in the home, should have never been on the table in the first place.

marriage-over-time-race.png


These numbers indicate that close to 70% of black couples have babies out of wedlock. And the odds of a couple sticking together, if they're not already married, is slim. Black children are at a HUGE disadvantage if there's only one actively involved parent. I believe in the value of mentorships. There are people that can offset the void of a parent, such as a stepfather, uncle, older brother, coach, or neighbor. If they're not being raised by their parents, by default they'll be raised/mentored by their peers, which is usually not a good ideal.

The Brookings Institute conducted a study where they gathered that only 2% of people find themselves in poverty that graduate high school, get a full-time job, and wait until they're 21 to get married and have children. Pretty basic strategy, which if followed, would minimize a lot of the grief.

figure7-1-w640.png

figure9-1-w640.png

tenor.gif
 

GhostOf301

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I’d shoot myself. Not a morning person at all.
It's just something you get used to. I've always been an early riser. It doesn't really matter what time I go to bed. Even on weekends I am up before 6:30. Sometimes I will fall back asleep, but for the most part I am an up and at em guy.
 
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brooky03

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Rubbish. There were more intact black families pre-1960. Only since LBJ's welfare initiative did the tide turn. The government paid unmarried women more if they didn't have a man in the house. Essentially they were married to the sate. The net loss has been catastrophic for the black community. Children need two actively involved parents. The stats on single-parent homes are jaw-dropping; the discrepancies that you see between single parent and two-parent homes is much wider than anything you'll see with race or gender. Of course not all women seek that, but offering more money, on the conditions of not having a man in the home, should have never been on the table in the first place.

marriage-over-time-race.png


These numbers indicate that close to 70% of black couples have babies out of wedlock. And the odds of a couple sticking together, if they're not already married, is slim. Black children are at a HUGE disadvantage if there's only one actively involved parent. I believe in the value of mentorships. There are people that can offset the void of a parent, such as a stepfather, uncle, older brother, coach, or neighbor. If they're not being raised by their parents, by default they'll be raised/mentored by their peers, which is usually not a good ideal.

The Brookings Institute conducted a study where they gathered that only 2% of people find themselves in poverty that graduate high school, get a full-time job, and wait until they're 21 to get married and have children. Pretty basic strategy, which if followed, would minimize a lot of the grief.

figure7-1-w640.png

figure9-1-w640.png

Like I said, that is your big viewpoint. I like the graphs.

You see a cause where I see a symptom. You see a solution where I see a piece to a larger, intricate puzzle.

 

brooky03

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It's just something you get used to. I've always been an early riser. It doesn't really matter what time I go to bed. Even on weekends I am up before 6:30. Sometimes I will fall back asleep, but for the most part I am an up and at em guy.

I get up around 7:30 and that’s really only because I have kids. Before kids, I had a job that started at 9:00, with a 12 minute commute. I woke up at 8:40 a lot of times.
 

lurkeraspect84

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Rubbish. There were more intact black families pre-1960. Only since LBJ's welfare initiative did the tide turn. The government paid unmarried women more if they didn't have a man in the house. Essentially they were married to the sate. The net loss has been catastrophic for the black community. Children need two actively involved parents. The stats on single-parent homes are jaw-dropping; the discrepancies that you see between single parent and two-parent homes is much wider than anything you'll see with race or gender. Of course not all women seek that, but offering more money, on the conditions of not having a man in the home, should have never been on the table in the first place.

marriage-over-time-race.png


These numbers indicate that close to 70% of black couples have babies out of wedlock. And the odds of a couple sticking together, if they're not already married, is slim. Black children are at a HUGE disadvantage if there's only one actively involved parent. I believe in the value of mentorships. There are people that can offset the void of a parent, such as a stepfather, uncle, older brother, coach, or neighbor. If they're not being raised by their parents, by default they'll be raised/mentored by their peers, which is usually not a good ideal.

The Brookings Institute conducted a study where they gathered that only 2% of people find themselves in poverty that graduate high school, get a full-time job, and wait until they're 21 to get married and have children. Pretty basic strategy, which if followed, would minimize a lot of the grief.

figure7-1-w640.png

figure9-1-w640.png
You wouldn't believe how some game the system down here. I know a lot of kids who live with Aunts and Grandmothers just for benefits.

I've talked with a lot of ppl who believe in having as many children as their body can handle. This isn't hyperbole. Had a friend named Kevin(RIP), who straight up said, it's for benefits. Another friend David(RIP), who said exact same thing.

I see it constantly at work, it's just how it is down here. A complete total different mindset than anywhere else I've lived (KY, Columbus, Tampa).

They've mastered gaming the system.

Another good one is ppl selling their SS# and then claiming identity theft.

*Also to touch on your point, there's some men who live somewhere else and not married for a couple of reasons. A)single mom benefits, B)he gets his, and C) he has his own place to sleep around.

Memphis is a shithole all the way around. But there's a lot of money here. So many cash deals who don't negotiate.

And don't get me started on some thoughts on how young a girl can be to have kids.
 
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dukedevilz

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ouldn’t just ignore it because it’s controversial. Again, black lives mattering shouldn’t be political.

Are schools replacing core education elements or topics with social justice propaganda? Unlikely.

Right wing activists might get less attention because they’re more wrong than Left wing activists. Unbiased thought is unlikely to be in the exact middle of the two at any given time. Pivoting back to education, what Right wing topics are struck down in schools? What are the Right wing talking points that aren’t discussed? Capitalism gets a lot of attention in school. I presume immigration is covered in historical and current terms. Nationalism/isolationism gets its shine. Religion is a no-no and gun ed is probably a bad idea. Is that it? Religion and guns?

CRT does have merit. It’s simply looking at history through a different lens. It doesn’t replace or supersede the existing core history topics. It doesn’t and shouldn’t teach ‘whitey bad, blacky good.’

CRT has strong ties to Marxism. No, it doesn't need to be taught. It's propaganda. Here's what Britannica says on it.

Critical race theory (CRT) was officially organized in 1989, at the first annual Workshop on Critical Race Theory, though its intellectual origins go back much farther, to the 1960s and ’70s. Its immediate precursor was the critical legal studies (CLS) movement, which dedicated itself to examining how the law and legal institutions serve the interests of the wealthy and powerful at the expense of the poor and marginalized. (CLS, an offshoot of Marxist-oriented critical theory, may also be viewed as a radicalization of early 20th-century legal realism, a school of legal philosophy according to which judicial decision making, especially at the appellate level, is influenced as much by nonlegal—political or ideological—factors as by precedent and principles of legal reasoning.

And here's what some CRT scholars have said:

Karen Pyke: Authority and power in all aspects of society contribute to feelings of inequality.

Ibram X. Kendi: The only remedy to past discrimination is present discrimination. The only remedy to present discrimination is future discrimination.

Richard Delgado: Critical race theorists (or “crits,” as they are sometimes called) hold that color blindness will allow us to redress only extremely egregious racial harms, ones that everyone would notice and condemn. But if racism is embedded in our thought processes and social structures as deeply as many crits believe, then the “ordinary business” of society—the routines, practices, and institutions that we rely on to effect the world’s work—will keep minorities in subordinate positions. Only aggressive, color-conscious efforts to change the way things are will do much to ameliorate misery.

Barbara Applebaum: “Wildman and Davis, for instance, contend that white supremacy is a system of oppression and privilege that all white people benefit from. Therefore, all white people “…are racist in this use of the term, because we benefit from systemic white privilege. Generally whites think of racism as voluntary, intentional conduct done by horrible others. Whites spend a lot of time trying to convince ourselves and each other that we are not racist. A big step would be for whites to admit that we are racist and then to consider what to do about it.”

Robin DiAngelo: “…a positive white identity is an impossible goal. White identity is inherently racist; white people do not exist outside the system of white supremacy.”
 

toonces11

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Anyways, I already have a vacation booked in January. So this might have to wait for the following year. But I can't get over how cheap airbnb's are in Bonaire and Curacao. I thought our trip a couple of years ago was decently priced, but damn.

Pretty awesome. Check out this place in Eleuthera (Bahamas). We just spent a week here a month ago and loved it so much we are going back in OCT.

https://eleutheravacationrentals.net/Unit/Details/129811
 

dukedevilz

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Those videos don’t really prove anything though, right? There are kids who think regular sex education is blasphemy. That doesn’t mean we shouldn’t teach kids about safe sex and STI’s. Likewise, her objection to teaching students about gender identity or sexuality isn’t best decided by her feelings on the matter. Furthermore, there shouldn’t be anything political about gender identity/sexuality.

Current events are also very important to discuss in schools. It’s the best place to discuss them. The BLM movement, like it or not, is a significant current event. Schools shouldn’t just ignore it because it’s controversial. Again, black lives mattering shouldn’t be political.

My issue with the girl that was abused was more with the white privilege talking points. She had a horrible childhood, clearly. And some teachers feel empowered to collectively judge a group of individuals. That's my biggest issue with CRT and other related topics. It collectively judges people, instead of advocating for individualism.

A key CRT concept is intersectionality, which emphasizes that race can intersect with other identities (such as gender and class) to produce complex combinations of power and disadvantage. Yet, if you keep fragmenting out further and further - say, wealth, attractiveness, intelligence, ability to socialize w/o anxiety, etc, the more you fragment out, the closer you get to a unique individual. And that is the proper way to look at things. CRT contends that colorblind laws aren't enough and we need to proactively redress what neutral laws can't address (i.e. fighting discrimination with discrimination).

You mention current events issues, such as BLM. Saying black lives matter is not controversial, of course (did anyone ever say, “black lives don’t matter??). And for that matter, saying all lives matter shouldn’t be controversial, either, since it's all-inclusive. Pretty sure bad stuff happens to people of all races. Would be fine to have discussions in class, except for the fact that there’s a heavy liberal bias which would invariably lead to intimidation factors, suppressing actual free thought. I don’t think most teachers could talk about these issues without being overtly political.
 

Kevin Bryan

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Jeff Bezos could have $10 million dollars of damage done to his house and it would take him a month to notice it.

Edit: Don’t quote me, but I’m pretty sure that money was in the omnibus spending bill that Covid relief was attached to, not a Covid relief bill.
Is Jeff Bezos spending U.S. tax money on bullshit projects overseas?

If not, I don't give a shit about his money.
 

brooky03

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Is Jeff Bezos spending U.S. tax money on bullshit projects overseas?

If not, I don't give a shit about his money.

I was just pointing out that in the context of US government spending, $10 million is zero dollars. Jeff Bezos is a very wealthy guy. His wealth is a small fraction of the country’s wealth. If he wouldn’t notice $10 million missing or $10 million in damage, the US government isn’t going to care about $10 million. So who cares what it gets spent on.