NIL. Good or bad for college sports?

Boilermaker03

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With what happened with Nigel Pack, is this the new norm? Also, how many of the coaches that are leaving over the last few years is due to the NIL writing on the wall?

Do you think NIL will ultimately be a good thing or bad for college athletics?
 

Fighter of the Nightman

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Good from a fairness perspective … anyone seriously think the published Sun Times story about Anthony Davis getting $200k was false? The paper stuck by it even after being taken to court. We all knew this shit was going on, and having it above board at least robs the NCAA of its ability to look the other way for some programs and crucify others. Additionally, I do believe the players deserve compensation for the money they’re making these universities.

However, I think the domino effects will be terrible. $800k to Nijel Pack? That’s insanity. And it will only amplify, to the point where recruiting could more or less be done virtually with a few numbers thrown around.

Jay Wright had the right idea!!
 

KUhawks34

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I think it’ll help keep kids in school longer thus helping the product. Kids that should go to the draft should continue to go to the draft but it’ll help the borderline guys that would normally leave and go play overseas or go not get picked.
 

Boilermaker03

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I honestly think this is overall bad for college sports. This is going to become an arms race and only those with the biggest pocketbooks are going to do well, buying the best teams you can buy. Much like the situation with Miami, there aren't many teams that can pay $400k/year for a top tier player let alone just a decent guard ala Pack. Then there's the issue where teams can horde players with all of that money. Scholarship limits? What's to stop a high 4* or 5* player walking on at a school if they are going to get top tier money for NIL? Who cares if they have to pay their own education if they are making hundreds of thousands of dollars.
 

Bert Higginbotha

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Good from a fairness perspective … anyone seriously think the published Sun Times story about Anthony Davis getting $200k was false? The paper stuck by it even after being taken to court. We all knew this shit was going on, and having it above board at least robs the NCAA of its ability to look the other way for some programs and crucify others. Additionally, I do believe the players deserve compensation for the money they’re making these universities.

However, I think the domino effects will be terrible. $800k to Nijel Pack? That’s insanity. And it will only amplify, to the point where recruiting could more or less be done virtually with a few numbers thrown around.

Jay Wright had the right idea!!
lie
 

Kevin Bryan

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Good for the power conferences, bad for the mid-majors. It just furthers the divide between programs that already had a massive advantage. It's time for the power conferences to just split off and do their own thing. Flip a giant bird to the NCAA and leave them to die.
 

GE Nole

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I honestly think this is overall bad for college sports. This is going to become an arms race and only those with the biggest pocketbooks are going to do well, buying the best teams you can buy. Much like the situation with Miami, there aren't many teams that can pay $400k/year for a top tier player let alone just a decent guard ala Pack. Then there's the issue where teams can horde players with all of that money. Scholarship limits? What's to stop a high 4* or 5* player walking on at a school if they are going to get top tier money for NIL? Who cares if they have to pay their own education if they are making hundreds of thousands of dollars.

College sports has been an arms race with a handful of the highest bidders accumulating most of the highest ranked talent for a while.

I wouldn’t say I’m thrilled with it, but it is fair in a capitalist society.

What’s funny is that the NCAA could have probably avoided all this if they just said the athletes were employees and paid them with a salary cap instituted. Instead they resisted, got taken to court, and the courts made it open season.
 

AuHoosier420

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I honestly think this is overall bad for college sports. This is going to become an arms race and only those with the biggest pocketbooks are going to do well, buying the best teams you can buy. Much like the situation with Miami, there aren't many teams that can pay $400k/year for a top tier player let alone just a decent guard ala Pack. Then there's the issue where teams can horde players with all of that money. Scholarship limits? What's to stop a high 4* or 5* player walking on at a school if they are going to get top tier money for NIL? Who cares if they have to pay their own education if they are making hundreds of thousands of dollars.
Plenty of power 5 teams can afford to pay. Including Purdue.
 

Boilermaker03

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Good for the power conferences, bad for the mid-majors. It just furthers the divide between programs that already had a massive advantage. It's time for the power conferences to just split off and do their own thing. Flip a giant bird to the NCAA and leave them to die.
I don't think it's a power conferences thing (as in the whole conference). I think it's only a handful of teams from each conference that can do this. I think this is going to split the power conferences as we know it in the long run unless something changes.
 

Boilermaker03

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College sports has been an arms race with a handful of the highest bidders accumulating most of the highest ranked talent for a while.

I wouldn’t say I’m thrilled with it, but it is fair in a capitalist society.

What’s funny is that the NCAA could have probably avoided all this if they just said the athletes were employees and paid them with a salary cap instituted. Instead they resisted, got taken to court, and the courts made it open season.
It has and it hasn't. It was a lot more rare than what it is now and what this is about to become. Now you're going to get middling players that want a bag of money.
 

Bert Higginbotha

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Good for the power conferences, bad for the mid-majors. It just furthers the divide between programs that already had a massive advantage. It's time for the power conferences to just split off and do their own thing. Flip a giant bird to the NCAA and leave them to die.
This. We need about 100 schools and let the other 230 go back to what used to be the old division 2.
 

boilerzz

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Live look at the NCAA today.....

b20b7d3a26451e443d58929b3cf3905f.gif
 

FaithPlusOne

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Live look at the NCAA today.....

b20b7d3a26451e443d58929b3cf3905f.gif
I don’t think it’s that bad for the NCAA. They don’t have to pay these players nor do their member institutions, but it keeps more talent in their ranks for longer, which may help viewership over time. From an “amateurism” standpoint though I agree. It definitely changes the NCAA quite a lot.

NIL certainly hurts the mid majors and lower high majors. The transfer portal hurts and helps the mid majors. They can upgrade in talent as well. How often have you seen a mid major recently that made the NCAA tournament and you said “oh yeah, I remember that guy. He was a decent player for some power 5 and transferred out.” I think mid majors can also make the recruiting pitch that they’ll help guys develop on the court to transfer up. It is probably a net negative, but some will make it work.
 

della

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With what happened with Nigel Pack, is this the new norm? Also, how many of the coaches that are leaving over the last few years is due to the NIL writing on the wall?

Do you think NIL will ultimately be a good thing or bad for college athletics?
It depends on how you define good and bad. If a school has a huge fan base with lots of money then it will be able to buy super star teams with regularity. If you like the notion of amateur athletics it is a bad thing because college sports teams will now be semi pro.

It will further divide the have's from the have nots. I think Tennessee will benefit, but I think it is a bad thing.
 

Ipartiedwithhopgood

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Memphis got a high profile guy so I'm not sure this is just the P5/P6 weighing in.

But here's the deal, America is built on some capitalism and we aren't gonna be selectively applying who gets to benefit from that system. The SCOTUS came down 9-0 and those people can't agree on anything but found a way to agree on this. They also fired a warning shot that any further cases are gonna be handled similarly

Not sure why we are pretending "college sports" is just now shifting, you can now see it, but it was always there. It really started with the TV contracts. Once that crazy $ started getting put on the table somebody was gonna be smart enough to take it.

So as a fan you have options. You can adapt or tap out.
 

IUBtown

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The only schools complaining are the ones who were outbid in private before but now it's being done out in the open. Ultimately it will be good for CBB. Will keep guys in that would have gone to G league or overseas. The market will fix itself. You're not going to see this Pack deal happen in a widespread bidding war like people are assuming. Of course I'm ok with it, feel like IU was always hesitant to do too much bidding and what not behind the scenes. This allows them to keep their holier than thou approach and still pay to get/keep guys.
 

WeAreDePaul

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Memphis got a high profile guy so I'm not sure this is just the P5/P6 weighing in.

But here's the deal, America is built on some capitalism and we aren't gonna be selectively applying who gets to benefit from that system. The SCOTUS came down 9-0 and those people can't agree on anything but found a way to agree on this. They also fired a warning shot that any further cases are gonna be handled similarly

Not sure why we are pretending "college sports" is just now shifting, you can now see it, but it was always there. It really started with the TV contracts. Once that crazy $ started getting put on the table somebody was gonna be smart enough to take it.

So as a fan you have options. You can adapt or tap out.
there are salary caps in every major sport except baseball. Why can't there be an NIL cap in college?
 
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WeAreDePaul

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You are referencing employees, college basketball players aren't employees they don't have a salary.

Are pro athlete's endorsements capped?

Before this goes further I concede you are real smart feel free to coach me up.
no you're right, NIL looks a lot like pro athlete's endorsements which is not capped. And at the pro level it does give some tangible benefit to big market teams in terms of attracting players. But, there are also countermeasures in place such as the max contract which allow the smaller markets to level the playing field in the hopes of keeping their star players. And the salary cap also helps keep the big teams from getting all the good players.

College doesn't have anything in its system taht can check the NILs and even things up for the smaller markets. There's nothing to stop a team from going out and offering as much money as they want to as many players as they want. Today it is Miami paying Pack $800,000. Next up it will be a big school buying multiple players for 7 figures each. Eventually you'll see a school give up on high school recruiting altogether and just put together a budget to go out and steal players from anywhere they want.

We might end up with a landscape that has even less parity than CBB has now and fans of smaller teams giving up on the sport altogether. I know I will if that's how this turns out.
 

Bert Higginbotha

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Players must get NIL but with no cap on it then the consequences for the game will become unimagionable.
The most wealthy will always have a humongous advantage.
Just like the MLB. The bigger the market the bigger the money.

It sucks and that is why I hate it for college basketball and football.

Do we want all the winners to be from LA, NY, Houston, Miami, Seattle........ etal
 

IUBtown

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there are salary caps in every major sport except baseball. Why can't there be an NIL cap in college?
Like was said advertising dollars aren't capped. It's why players can take less money and play in bigger markets. To not think that matters is foolish. It's most certainly helps/hinders pro free agency. NIL being capped would get shut down real quick in a court room. Pack was leaving either way, this type of situation is a very small percentage of transfers every year.
 

KisteK

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It has and it hasn't. It was a lot more rare than what it is now and what this is about to become. Now you're going to get middling players that want a bag of money.
So?
Nobody has to give middling players any money. Let him walk, let someone else pay him.

I'm in the party that this will all settle, soon. It might take a couple seasons, but the NIL rules will get tweaked and the unknown money will go back to being unknown.

There'll become a balance. Not all the Pack's are going to get $800k/2yr.

Also, sweet get for Pack.
Admittedly I didn't want him to go to the B1G.. and am pretty stoked my favorite squad doesn't have to face him 2+ times for the next 2 years. I hope he balls tf out in the ACC.
 

Boilermaker03

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It depends on how you define good and bad. If a school has a huge fan base with lots of money then it will be able to buy super star teams with regularity. If you like the notion of amateur athletics it is a bad thing because college sports teams will now be semi pro.

It will further divide the have's from the have nots. I think Tennessee will benefit, but I think it is a bad thing.
The highlighted part IMO is all bad. I'm for players getting some money in the form of NIL or salary, but nothing near what is going on right now.

It's bad for college basketball because part of what made the sport so good was the, let's call it, illusion of parity. That's going right out the window.

It's bad that it's furthering the divide as well. P5 teams that don't have a history of being a have whether it's just from good luck getting the right coach or cheating or anything in between. They are going to struggle. This will also effect the tournament negatively IMO because the mid majors are going to lose their top talent for "greener" pastures.
 
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Boilermaker03

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Win some, you lose some. Do we really think Big Dog Robinson chose Purdue because he wanted to be an engineer?
Your argument that Purdue cheated is because they got a great player once in a blue moon? I'm not saying they never have, but it's just not in Purdue's DNA to do this sort of thing. We are definitely going to fall behind because of it. Wouldn't surprise me one bit if Painter quit much sooner than he normally would have. He doesn't like this sort of thing.
 

IUBtown

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The highlighted part IMO is all bad. I'm for players getting some money in the form of NIL or salary, but nothing near what is going on right now.

It's bad for college basketball because part of what made the sport so good was the, let's call it, illusion of parity. That's going right out the window.

It's bad that it's furthering the divide as well. P5 teams that don't have a history of being a have whether it's just from good luck getting the right coach or cheating or anything in between. They are going to struggle. This will also effect the tournament negatively IMO because the mid majors are going to lose their top talent for "greener" pastures.
Why is that bad? And why is that the assumption over one transaction?
 
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Ipartiedwithhopgood

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Your argument that Purdue cheated is because they got a great player once in a blue moon? I'm not saying they never have, but it's just not in Purdue's DNA to do this sort of thing. We are definitely going to fall behind because of it. Wouldn't surprise me one bit if Painter quit much sooner than he normally would have. He doesn't like this sort of thing.

Boilermaker03. It's over. I'm sorry.

If it's not in Purdue's DNA to compete at the highest level within the current rules you should be annoyed by Purdue's philosophy, not the rules.

It's business.

My argument is the rules changed because the rules should have changed, and everyone that doesn't like it can either adapt or play more golf with their free time.

My other argument is fans threatening to walk won't. But who knows Gen Z is digital maybe they do.

I"m sure Painter and all these dinosaur coaches don't like it. They are now uber drivers. They didn't all sign up for that. It's not for everybody. But I bet there's a lot of resumes turned in when all these relics exit.
 
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