Covid: Your Town

GhostOf301

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There's already a thread for claiming everything is racist. Let's keep this one from evolving into another one of those.
 
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GhostOf301

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There has been increasing talk about the T cell immunity. I don't remember if it was ITT or the othere where I posted an article where scientists were finding that up to 80% of us have the T cells that fight the virus naturally before we develop antibodies. Meaning that some people are immune and the vast majority of us will never show symptoms. I have a theory as a non expert asshole with an opinion that if the numbers are as low as China is reporting them to be in Chy na, this may be a reasonable explanation. Because they have been exposed to more animal to human coronaviruses than the rest of the world. (I would imagine)

Anyways, this does not necessarily mean that we should just assume that we can't get it. But it does give hope for a more effective vaccine than first thought.

https://www.sciencemag.org/news/202...vid-19-patients-bode-well-long-term-immunity#
 
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GhostOf301

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More goal post moving. Allegedly, the masks don't protect you from catching the virus. They keep YOU from spreading the virus.

This is nothing more than exploiting a man's death for an agenda.
 

UL_1986

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More goal post moving. Allegedly, the masks don't protect you from catching the virus. They keep YOU from spreading the virus.

This is nothing more than exploiting a man's death for an agenda.
Lots of reports..both local and national. I don’t really see any exploitation here. Especially if the man was vehemently against wearing a mask.

Also, I get what you’re saying with prevention but I don’t think your notion is 100% correct, I do think that masks prevent you from getting other people sick, yes..but if you don’t wear one and another person asymptomatic/has the virus unknowingly.. and they’re not wearing a mask either, the potential seems greater to catch it no covering your face.
 
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GhostOf301

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Lots of reports..both local and national. I don’t really see any exploitation here. Especially if the man was vehemently against wearing a mask.
Again, the theory is that masks don't protect you from catching the virus. They supposedly keep you from spreading it. So him wearing a mask, not wearing a mask is only relevant to make an example out of someone who isn't around anymore.

Of the 130,000 + in the U.S. or the 570,000+ deaths or the over 12 million people who have contracted the virus, do you suppose there may be one or two cases where people were wearing masks and still contracted it?
 

UL_1986

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Again, the theory is that masks don't protect you from catching the virus. They supposedly keep you from spreading it. So him wearing a mask, not wearing a mask is only relevant to make an example out of someone who isn't around anymore.

Of the 130,000 + in the U.S. or the 570,000+ deaths or the over 12 million people who have contracted the virus, do you suppose there may be one or two cases where people were wearing masks and still contracted it?
I edited my last post.
 

GhostOf301

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I edited my last post.
Well, they are finding it difficult to prove that asymptomatic people spread the virus easily if at all. The virus is mostly spread through droplets that asymptomatic people don't produce. And that is what masks are or are not protecting you from. The studies they have done where they are concerned about asymptomatic people spreading it is when one contaminates objects like door handles and salt shakers. Stuff like that. So masks are obsolete in that scenario.
 

UL_1986

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Well, they are finding it difficult to prove that asymptomatic people spread the virus easily if at all. The virus is mostly spread through droplets that asymptomatic people don't produce. And that is what masks are or are not protecting you from. The studies they have done where they are concerned about asymptomatic people spreading it is when one contaminates objects like door handles and salt shakers. Stuff like that. So masks are obsolete in that scenario.
I gotcha. Idk, I just saw the story and posted it. Wasn’t trying to incorporate some slander to the dudes name. The story is incredibly sad to me honestly.
 
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GhostOf301

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I gotcha. Idk, I just saw the story and posted it. Wasn’t trying to incorporate some slander to the dudes name. The story is incredibly sad to me honestly.
It is sad. And I certainly don't mean to brush it off. Even if that is what I did. I just don't like the narrative behind stories like that. Told ya so BS without even being factual IMO. Not your fault they wrote that article.

And I have to say, I know a lot of what I post regarding the virus can be interpreted as downplaying the effects and dismissing the seriousness of it. I am just frustrated by the deliberate misinformation and fear mongering behind it. It may be the biggest fear campaign in our lifetime just behind or ahead of Y2K, 2012 or terrorism.
 
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I am stupid

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@TheDude1 They have released our local schools reopening "guidelines/options". Option 1, kids go to school 5 days as normal, but follow the states guidelines. Basically; Temp checks every day for everyone(students and staff), social distancing, wearing a mask when not 6ft apart(going in and out of class, sitting not 6 ft apart, etc...), hand sanitizer everywhere, etc...

Option 2 all online. The caveat is if you do this, you can't participate in extracurricular activities. Sports, academic team, band, choir, etc...
 

TheDude1

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@TheDude1 They have released our local schools reopening "guidelines/options". Option 1, kids go to school 5 days as normal, but follow the states guidelines. Basically; Temp checks every day for everyone(students and staff), social distancing, wearing a mask when not 6ft apart(going in and out of class, sitting not 6 ft apart, etc...), hand sanitizer everywhere, etc...

Option 2 all online. The caveat is if you do this, you can't participate in extracurricular activities. Sports, academic team, band, choir, etc...
Interesting that they offer both. Makes sense. Do you have to decide for the YEAR, or by semester? The biggest issue I am seeing with being in the classroom an entire day is the simple amount of time spent in the room with other people... the air changes per hour on our HVAC systems just seem way too low. Where are you again, KY?

We are not doing temp checks... it was felt that it would simply be too much of a burden, and our nurses felt that it wasn't really useful... that most kids are asymptomatic anyway, its more of a false sense of security. We will be doing symptom checks, and possibly an online check-in every morning where parents have to do a quick online survey just acknowledging that they have taken temperature and checked for symptoms and their kid seems fine. Fingers crossed that added pressure keeps people honest.
 

I am stupid

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For the first semester. I have the same issues with everything you said. I imagine a big line standing outside getting temperature checks every morning. This is eastern Ky. We are only now starting to "spread" the virus. Only a handful of cases until the past month or so. Even now, we only have about 60 cases out of about 20,000 ppl. Smallllll town.
 

toonces11

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For the first semester. I have the same issues with everything you said. I imagine a big line standing outside getting temperature checks every morning. This is eastern Ky. We are only now starting to "spread" the virus. Only a handful of cases until the past month or so. Even now, we only have about 60 cases out of about 20,000 ppl. Smallllll town.
So say a K-12 school opens and there is an outbreak of 60% of kids out of 1000......so pretty massive spread. What do the stats tell us on if all of them survive?
 

TheDude1

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So say a K-12 school opens and there is an outbreak of 60% of kids out of 1000......so pretty massive spread. What do the stats tell us on if all of them survive?
It’s not just kids you worry about, but staff and family.
 

toonces11

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It’s not just kids you worry about, but staff and family.
Are these said families and staff wearing masks, going to stores, going to the pool, interacting with friends? My point is...at some point you have to have acceptable risk in my opinion. There are pro's and cons and I think the pros outweigh the cons. Consider parents not having childcare and leaving kids at home that shouldn't be. Consider kids whose only refuge from shitty home life is school. Consider kids who only have solid breakfasts and lunches at school. The districts should take as many precautions as they can to protect teachers as well----but its about the students, just as my job makes it my duty to help patients even though it increases my risk.

And this isn't a targeted statement, but I think it wildly changes ones view if they are getting paid to stay at home.
 
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SNU0821

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It’s not just kids you worry about, but staff and family.
The number of young kids who have gotten the virus is astronomically low. Also, kids don’t spread the virus very well. As long as the teachers wear masks and take precautions, they should be fine.
 

TheDude1

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Are these said families and staff wearing masks, going to stores, going to the pool, interacting with friends? My point is...at some point you have to have acceptable risk in my opinion. There are pro's and cons and I think the pros outweigh the cons. Consider parents not having childcare and leaving kids at home that shouldn't be. Consider kids whose only refuge from shitty home life is school. Consider kids who only have solid breakfasts and lunches at school. The districts should take as many precautions as they can to protect teachers as well----but its about the students, just as my job makes it my duty to help patients even though it increases my risk.

And this isn't a targeted statement, but I think it wildly changes ones view if they are getting paid to stay at home.
This is an excellent time to reflect on how the responsibility for feeding kids and not abusing them falls on schools and teachers, rather than on families.

And sure, you have to weigh the risks and rewards. I am not sure if reopening schools fully in certain parts of the country is the smart thing to do, when you weigh the risks and rewards.

And the job of a teacher and the job of a doctor are not the same, in terms of responsibility.
 

toonces11

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This is an excellent time to reflect on how the responsibility for feeding kids and not abusing them falls on schools and teachers, rather than on families.

And sure, you have to weigh the risks and rewards. I am not sure if reopening schools fully in certain parts of the country is the smart thing to do, when you weigh the risks and rewards.

And the job of a teacher and the job of a doctor are not the same, in terms of responsibility.
Might be an even more important time to put all the focus on broken homes and American family life. It seems like people can somehow draw up all this passion for social justice issues, yet neglect the vulnerable they leave at home on a daily basis. The countries priorities are def screwed up and it 100% shouldn't be on the teachers and schools to provide the basic necessities.....nor should tax payers foot the bill for, at best...irresponsible parenting..at worst, child abuse and neglect.

And you make an excellent point in which Ive agreed with since the start. You can't blanket open schools as we should have never blanket closed the country. Its needs to be done on an area by area basis using common sense and weighing area risk factors. Its baffling we haven't done this from the get-go.

Teachers and doctors have similar responsibilities in many regards. Educate, keep them healthy and safe, give rational and solid advice on how to thrive.
 
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SNU0821

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toonces11

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It seems like that is clearly becoming the consensus for many. It seems like it’s just the MSM, the left and some smaller subset of normal people who are opposed. And even of those who are opposed, it does seem as though there is an ulterior motive for the hesitancy.
I think most agree in principle, that schools should be open and kids attend as soon as possible. I think we can all agree we want the kids to be safe. But some how....mainly b/c trump has pushed for opening....its become a political issue and not a common sense stance. Nobody is suggesting to put kids in harms way. Not government, not teachers, not parents.

Will there be positive cases at schools? Of ****ing course. But you deal with those cases rationally---just as you would when kids get any other sickness.
 

SNU0821

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I think most agree in principle, that schools should be open and kids attend as soon as possible. I think we can all agree we want the kids to be safe. But some how....mainly b/c trump has pushed for opening....its become a political issue and not a common sense stance. Nobody is suggesting to put kids in harms way. Not government, not teachers, not parents.

Will there be positive cases at schools? Of ****ing course. But you deal with those cases rationally---just as you would when kids get any other sickness.
Have you seen what the LA Teachers Union is demanding now before sending kids back to school? It's literally f'ing absurd.

https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/...d-charter-moratorium-before-reopening-schools
 
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UL_1986

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https://www.washingtonpost.com/nation/2020/07/14/coronavirus-live-updates-us/



An experimental coronavirus vaccine was safe and triggered immune responses in all 45 participants in the first human tests, according to an article published Tuesday in the New England Journal of Medicine.


“Any way you slice this, it’s good news,” Anthony S. Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said in an interview. “The first step is to get the antibodies. How long it lasts is an important question, but as long as you get it [initially], that’s a good first step.”




Probably the best news I’ve read about a vaccine yet. @GhostOf301
 

GhostOf301

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https://www.washingtonpost.com/nation/2020/07/14/coronavirus-live-updates-us/



An experimental coronavirus vaccine was safe and triggered immune responses in all 45 participants in the first human tests, according to an article published Tuesday in the New England Journal of Medicine.


“Any way you slice this, it’s good news,” Anthony S. Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said in an interview. “The first step is to get the antibodies. How long it lasts is an important question, but as long as you get it [initially], that’s a good first step.”




Probably the best news I’ve read about a vaccine yet. @GhostOf301
Any good news is great. I am a believer of healthy people developing natural antibodies until there is a reliable vaccine. That's why I don't think that the increase in cases among the younger population is a bad thing. But I do find these trials to be very promising.
 
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GhostOf301

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I have been told that this is a far right wing source. But when you see the number of daily deaths reported, that just means that is the day they were reported, not the day they occurred. And worldmeters, the site that records world data, uses the reported numbers each day as if they occurred that day. So you see these alarmingly high numbers and it concerns you. But when you place the deaths in chronological order, you get a much different story.

https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nvss/vsrr/COVID19/index.htm
 

bignish

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I have been told that this is a far right wing source. But when you see the number of daily deaths reported, that just means that is the day they were reported, not the day they occurred. And worldmeters, the site that records world data, uses the reported numbers each day as if they occurred that day. So you see these alarmingly high numbers and it concerns you. But when you place the deaths in chronological order, you get a much different story.

https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nvss/vsrr/COVID19/index.htm
I do wish we had more timely data being reported but as long as they are correctly labeling COVID deaths, does it matter in the grand scheme of things whether a Florida person died yesterday or a week ago from COVID?

There's a definite lag in reporting but all that means is that in 2 months when Florida is barely reporting cases, you"ll still see 50 deaths being recorded then due to health officials sifting through backlog and and verifying root cause from death certificates. You're seeing this now in New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania.

Don't get lulled into a sense of complacency just because the deaths happened a few days or weeks ago. People dying today might now show up on Worldometers till next week but that doesn't mean the situation is getting any better.

We're approaching the April peak in terms of hospitalizations now nationwide.


We're likely to see deaths top 1000+ regularly going forward unless we get R<1 and slow the spread down. This can only be accomplished by wearing masks and social distancing effectively.
 

SNU0821

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I do wish we had more timely data being reported but as long as they are correctly labeling COVID deaths, does it matter in the grand scheme of things whether a Florida person died yesterday or a week ago from COVID?

There's a definite lag in reporting but all that means is that in 2 months when Florida is barely reporting cases, you"ll still see 50 deaths being recorded then due to health officials sifting through backlog and and verifying root cause from death certificates. You're seeing this now in New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania.

Don't get lulled into a sense of complacency just because the deaths happened a few days or weeks ago. People dying today might now show up on Worldometers till next week but that doesn't mean the situation is getting any better.

We're approaching the April peak in terms of hospitalizations now nationwide.



We're likely to see deaths top 1000+ regularly going forward unless we get R<1 and slow the spread down. This can only be accomplished by wearing masks and social distancing effectively.
What about how COVID deaths are being accounted for? What we're now seeing is no matter what the cause of death is, if the person had COVID it's being labeled as a COVID death. So for example, you could get hit by a car and die. But if you had COVID, it's still labeled as a COVID related death. That's wrong and shouldn't happen. This is a byproduct of hospitals getting more money for the number of COVID cases/deaths.

So I take the number of deaths with a grain of salt. The data seems to be seriously flawed. It's hard to make any sort of decision when the data being used is partial, incomplete or misleading.
 

GhostOf301

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What about how COVID deaths are being accounted for? What we're now seeing is no matter what the cause of death is, if the person had COVID it's being labeled as a COVID death. So for example, you could get hit by a car and die. But if you had COVID, it's still labeled as a COVID related death. That's wrong and shouldn't happen. This is a byproduct of hospitals getting more money for the number of COVID cases/deaths.

So I take the number of deaths with a grain of salt. The data seems to be seriously flawed. It's hard to make any sort of decision when the data being used is partial, incomplete or misleading.
Not to mention half of our country's deaths are of our own doing. Between the nursing homes and the misuse of ventilators.

Something that nobody will acknowledge is that despite almost 140,000 deaths of a new cause, our death rate has only risen by 0.102 per 100,000. The same yearly rise as it has since 2012. We're on pace to be over 100,000 fewer deaths from heart disease than the yearly average. On pace to be over 20,000 fewer deaths from the flu than last year, over 60,000 fewer than the year before.

Life expectancy in the United States is 79 years old. Average age of covid deaths, 80.
 
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SNU0821

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Not to mention half of our country's deaths are of our own doing. Between the nursing homes and the misuse of ventilators.

Something that nobody will acknowledge is that despite almost 140,000 deaths of a new cause, our death rate has only risen by 0.102 per 100,000. The same yearly rise as it has since 2012. We're on pace to be over 100,000 fewer deaths from heart disease than the yearly average. On pace to be over 20,000 fewer deaths from the flu than last year, over 60,000 fewer than the year before.

Life expectancy in the United States is 79 years old. Average age of covid deaths, 80.
I particularly like when people try and compare what we've done to other European countries. We've now conducted more tests than the pretty much the entire population of Spain, for example.

I just don't understand how anyone can make any decision when the data we're being presented isn't trustworthy.
 

GhostOf301

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North Carolina is the 11th state to reach 100,000 cases. There are 18 states with more deaths.